Cuts of Beef from the Beef Primal Loin

Beef Loin Steak Photograph

The Beef Loin Top Loin Steak is the first type of steak cut from the beef loin. It is cut from the end of the beef loin which contains the last or 13th rib. This steak is identified by the large eye muscle, the rib bone, and part of the backbone.

Cooking Recommendations

Broil, Grill, Panbroil, or Panfry



Beef T-Bone Steak Photograph

 

The T-Bone steak has the characteristic "T" shaped vertebrae and the large eye muscle. The smaller muscle located below the T-bone is the tenderloin.

Cooking Recommendations

Broil, Grill, Panbroil, or Panfry

 

 


Beef Porterhouse Steak Photograph

The Porterhouse Steak is similar to the T-bone steak. However the tenderloin muscle is much larger and an extra muscle is located in the center of the porterhouse steak on the upper side.

Cooking Recommendations

Broil, Grill, Panbroil, or Panfry

 

 


Beef Tenderloin Steak (Filet Mignon) Photograph

The most tender retail cut from the entire beef carcass is the Beef Loin Tenderloin Steak. This steak has a fine texture, is circular in shape and is usually about three inches in diameter.  Also known as a "Filet Mignon".

Cooking Recommendations

Broil, Grill, Panbroil, or Panfry




Beef Sirloin Steak - Boneless Photograph


The Beef Loin Sirloin Steak - Boneless is an excellent steak for broiling and is made by removing all of the bones from any of the other types of sirloin steaks.

Cooking Recommendations

Broil, Grill, Panbroil, or Panfry

 


 

Grilling

Grilling is a variation of broiling, which is usually done on a grill with charcoal or gas flames. Charcoal briquettes are commonly used for grilling. When starting charcoal, highly flammable materials are used often used that cause large amounts of open flames. These flames should be allowed to burn off and the charcoal should become a gray color. Although they require a longer preparation time than gas they burn very hot and consistently for a long period of time.

When the charcoal becomes gray and the heat is even throughout the grill. The meat is placed on the grill and is browned on side, seasoned, and then the other side is grilled to the desired doneness. The flames from the charcoal or gas should never be aloud to come in contact with the meat. Frame-ups should be avoided by sprinkling with a small amount of water.

Grilling is a variation of broiling, which is usually done on a grill with charcoal or gas flames. Charcoal briquettes are commonly used for grilling. When starting charcoal, highly flammable materials are used often used that cause large amounts of open flames. These flames should be allowed to burn off and the charcoal should become a gray color. Although they require a longer preparation time than gas they burn very hot and consistently for a long period of time.

When the charcoal becomes gray and the heat is even throughout the grill. The meat is placed on the grill and is browned on side, seasoned, and then the other side is grilled to the desired doneness. The flames from the charcoal or gas should never be aloud to come in contact with the meat. Frame-ups should be avoided by sprinkling with a small amount of water.

Grilling is a method of cooking beef over open flame or an intense heat source.  Often meat is rubbed with spices or marinades before grilling. Steaks should be 1-1 thick and fillets up to 2 thick.

To Grill Beef: If you are grilling outdoors, your charcoal coals should be ash gray and you should only be able to hold your hand over the grill for 3-4 seconds.  The thickest pieces of meats should be placed at the coolest section of the grill because they will need longer to cook. Cook to desired doneness. 

Grilling is a very popular method of dry cooking for steaks and chops. Start the charcoal, or preheat a gas grill, 30 minutes or so before you plan to grill the meat. The coals should be covered with a light gray ash when you begin to grill.

Steaks or chops for grilling need to be at least three quarters of an inch thick. You should trim the excess fat from around the edges to prevent flare ups. Also place cuts into the remaining fat at about one inch intervals, which will prevent the meat from curling. Make sure you always use a tongs when turning meat on the grill. A fork pierces the meat and causes the loss of juice.

Grilling times for steaks and chops can be approximated, and only approximated. The following times should be considered reasonable estimates rather that hard facts. The total cooking time for a three quarter inch thick steak will be about 12 to 16 minutes for a rare to medium degree of doneness. With a one inch thick steak the total cooking time will be about 15 to 20 minutes. A one and one half inch thick steak will have a total cooking time of 22 to 28 minutes. The only safe way to obtain the degree of doneness you wish with steaks is to make a small slit near the bone to see the color of the meat. You can also use an instant read thermometer to check the middle temperature of a thick steak or chop. Judging by the color of the meat will give you much better results than generalized time estimates.

When you grill a beef tenderloin, the total cooking time will be about 8 to 10 minutes for a thickness of one and one half inches. It should be turned with the tongs, and the degree of doneness confirmed by making a small slit into the meat. The same kind of visual test should be used for a pork tenderloin.

Broil

Broiling is done in an oven or outdoor grill. Cook the meat until it is browned on one side. Then broil the other side to the desired doneness.

Broiling is very similar to grilling, and the major factor affecting the cooking time is the distance your pan is placed from the heat. If the pan is placed about 3 to 4 inches from the heat source, give a three quarter inch thick steak or chop 4 minutes on the first side and 4 minutes on the second side and check for doneness by making a small slit in the steak. With a one inch thick steak or chop, give it 6 or 7 minutes on each side before

Panbroil

Panbroiling is similar to oven broiling however it is faster and more convenient. A nonstick pan is used to cook the meat until brown on both sides due to occasional turning. There is no need to add water or cover the meat.

Pan-broiling means to cook the meat in a heavy preheated (hot) fry pan with no oil or water. This produces a good deal of smoke. Leave the fry pan uncovered and turn occasionally. You will have to test for the desired degree of doneness by making a small slit in the meat.

Panfry

Panfrying only differs from panbroiling in that a small amount of fat is added first. Panfrying is used on ground, or thin slices of meat.

Heat a small amount of oil over medium heat. Do not add the meat until the oil is hot. Leave uncovered and turn occasionally until you reach the desired level of doneness. Check for doneness by making a small slit in the meat.

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Click here to see our Beef Cooking Chart.  Includes the recommended
times and temperature to cook the Beef Cuts on this page!

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Last Updated - Monday, February 06, 2012 08:48 PM